Hello, Vineyard Adventurers! We wanted to let you know that the regional blogging series will be continuing, but life happens while you’re making other plans. An intense month of doing business in Italy and some personal life changes have us rearranging many things around here. Thanks for staying with us, we’ll be back with you…

“…lightly, softly, go yourself, to Tuscany…” – Guido Cavalcanti
It took me over a week to fall asleep without earplugs when I moved into my apartment in Sant’Angelo in Colle, a tiny hamlet close to Montalcino in Tuscany (Siena province) where I lived for nearly 3 months. My beautiful top floor (just a 3 floor walk up) apartment was directly across from the church whose bells would chime on the hour all night long.

This recipe is a twist on the classic recipe which is usually served cold with lemon and capers. I’ve made some changes to better accompany the rich flavors of our Brunnello di Montalcino, adding rich Marscapone to give it body and omitting the lemon.

Umbria possesses a wealth of cultural heritage as well as a natural beauty giving the region the nickname, “The Green Heart of Italy.” It is called this partly due to its physical location landlocked in the center of the boot, and partly due to its beautiful, rolling green hills fed by the lakes and rivers that sustain its verdure. From underground Roman cisterns to modern art museums and jazz, to the outdoors and everything in between, the culture in Umbria has something to offer literally anyone.

Getting to and around Italy can easily be the most frustrating part of a wonderful vacation. These tips from our years of traveling back and forth between Italy and the USA should save you some time and grief. Flying A photo posted by Robbin Gheesling (@robbin_g) on Sep 2, 2013 at 11:21am PDT There are…

When we think about Italian culture, several things might immediately pop into our heads. The first thing that comes to mind for me is always “Civilization” and the many connotations of the word.

From the steep Alpine slopes of Sampeyre to the coastline of Napoli, all the way down the heel of the boot to Lecce, and everywhere in between, Italy’s cuisine is as varied as its landscape. All too often when we think of Italian food, our minds immediately might go to things like spaghetti bolognese, spaghetti…

Over the next 20 months, I will be trying to break down the wines by region which is hard enough. For this introduction to Italian Wine Basics, we will discuss the wine law structure which is at least something fairly consistent across the country. Denominazione: How Italian Wine is Classified Italy follows what’s called a…

Buongiorno e buon anno! Hello and happy new year! More than a year ago, I was searching for wineries on other travel and directory sites. What I found was the standard fare, easily found in other guidebooks and on the well-trodden wine lover’s path. Even these directory listings provided only basic information about opening times and…

  I think I first found Co-Schedule in a Facebook ad. I can’t really be sure. But if so, then go Facebook algorithm!  You got that one right at least. When I first took a “tour” of co-schedule, I think it took me about 3 seconds to fall in love with the visuals; then I…

I’ve been spending quite a bit of time the last few months hammering out all the technical bits for the new site launch in October, so my post for this months #ItalianFWT initiative isn’t quite as good as I’d hoped. When I heard the topic was volcanic wines, I knew I needed to at least…

Dolcetto (dole – chet – toe): the name itself is a bit deceiving. In Italian, it would mean “little sweet one,” but this red Piemontese wine is no sweeter than a Chianti or a Bordeaux. In fact, “dolcetto” takes its name from the Piemontese hills that are named, in dialect, Duzzet. Piemonte, or Piedmont, is…

Living in Bra, Italy in the Piemonte region provides access to many small, surrounding Italian villages. Each one boasts a fine, regional wine: Barbera d’Asti, Grignolino, Barolo and Barbaresco to name a few. One fine, sunny Sunday, some friends and I found ourselves in Verduno, the land of Pelaverga Rosso DOC. This is a fairly…

W is for white cauliflower: White cavolfiore (cauliflower) is widely and internationally known, such a common vegetable that the average dinner-partier does not think twice about the origins of that hard, bumpy, white vegetable among the others on the veggie and dip platter. The white cauliflower is actually relatively new in terms of cultivated plants…

V is for vitellone bianco dell’apennine centrale IGP: The Vitellone Bianco dell’Apennine Centrale IGP, or white veal of the Central Apennine mountain range of Protected Geographic Origin, is superior quality veal that is raised in Campania near the Apennine mountain range. The cattle and steer are also raised in other Italian regions near the Apennines,…

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